• STORIES

    DD, Aged 17

    When people would talk they didn't know what to say which was understandable.  more...

  • STORIES

    Mimi - 15 years old

    I lost myself doing stupid things, angry and sad and depressed at everything. I ended up failing my classes, not caring about school, and getting into fights.  more...

  • STORIES

    Chelsea - 14 years old

    I stuck my head round the door in the room mum was in, and she looked really ill. I couldn't understand what was happening - one minute my mum was fine and the next she was ill.  more...

  • STORIES

    Clair - aged 14

    Something I wish is I could just have one more day with my dad! - to tell him how much I love him and how sorry I am for all the bad things I have said and done to him!  more...

  • STORIES

    Nicole - 17 years old

    This time the doctors are unable to operate. He has already had 6 sessions of chemo and is having another 6 sessions. I cannot help feeling I may lose him.  more...

  • STORIES

    Rirrif - 15 years old

    I have been staying with my dad because my mom doesn't want me around when she is sick, which is all the time. My dad works at night so I spend a lot of time alone since I'm not with my mom. I'm afraid she is going to die and I'll blame myself for not being there more. more...

  • STORIES

    HT - 13 years old

    She has been so strong about this and is keen to put it all behind her.  more...


Are nuts good for us?

It´s Christmas time and for many people nuts are a big part of the ‘Christmas diet´. What does the science say about nuts — are they good for us?

There have been various studies on this topic, suggesting that eating nuts are beneficial, and a group of researchers recently piled several studies together to have a closer look at the evidence for this. When researchers combine many studies in a systematic and thorough way to see what the summary of the evidence is, we call it a systematic review and that’s the best way of getting an overview of available evidence on a particular topic.

In this particular systematic review, the researchers wanted to find out whether eating a certain amount of nuts on a daily basis might have a positive effect on developing diseases like heart disease and cancer. When they compiled all the evidence from 20 different studies, the researchers found that eating 28 gram of nuts daily (that’s about a handful) was linked with a reduced risk of getting both heart disease and cancer.

So it seems to be beneficial for our health but we can’t say for sure with this type of research whether the reduction they found in people developing cancer was definitely because of the amount of nuts they were eating. There may be other factors in people’s lives that also contribute to the reduced risk, for example it may be that people had generally a healthy lifestyle and a good balanced diet. These are factors that researchers try to take into account when they analyse all the data from the studies so that the research can be as accurate as possible. However, it is almost impossible to account for all possible factors that are relevant for each individual in the research so we can’t know for sure that the beneficial effect was because of eating nuts and not something else, or perhaps just partly because of eating nuts.

In any case, nuts are high in what we call ‘good fats’ and can definitely be eaten as part of a healthy diet. Remember that unsalted nuts are healthier because too much salt in our diets is not good for our blood pressure.

You can read more about this research on the NHS Choices website.

This article was first published : 15.12.2016

0 Comments so far...





764864